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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
So I was at the Bike displays in Daytona Beach today. All The Japanese Manufacturers were there with their 2014 models. I sat on dozens of bikes and got a feel for them.

The '14 Burgman was there along with the VStrom 650 and V strom 100.
The new Burgman was easy to roll around and I put the bike on and off the center stand without any difficulty. Rolling resistance was quite good. I sat on the '14 650 and the seat was fine. The feel was very similar to my '12 B400 except for an extra hundred pounds. My biggest dislike about the 650 were the side view mirrors. They seemed pretty poor compared to my 400 mirrors. I could reach the ground on the Vstrom 650 and the balance of the Vstrom 650 felt better than the Vstrom 1000.

I sat on the Suzuki C90t and M109R as well. The C90t is a lot of bike for the money if you want a cruiser. Overall, I liked the Burgman 650 the best of all the Suzuki models.

Next, I went to Yamaha and Vstar. I wasn't expecting much here as they don't have many models I'm interested in buying. They are nice bikes and the FJR was truly impressive for the money. The Vstars were great deals as well.

Kawasaki was a surprise for me. The Vulcan models are really priced well and are very comfortable. If I was in the market for a cruiser I'd seriously consider a Kawasaki Vulcan. If you haven't sat on a Vulcan and compared them to the Vstar or Suzuki I think it's worth your time.

Finally, Honda was where the action seemed to be at the displays. The CTX 1300 was getting a lot of attention and it was quite comfortable. The stereo was blaring from the bike (they had 3 of them there) and the sound was good. The low center of gravity combined with the low seat height made the CTX1300 feel like a cross between a cruiser and a sport tourer.
Most of the older guys seemed to like it (myself included). The bike was pricey at an MSRP of $18K. Honestly, it is overpriced at $18K and I would want to pay maybe $12 or $13 for it.

I sat on the CTX 700. Again, low center of gravity and seat height. The CTX 700 felt lighter than my '12 B400. It felt like a beginner's bike (which isn't necessarily a bad thing) and didn't seem the right fit for me. The NC700 was there and I sat on it. I liked the NC700 more than the Vstrom 650 in terms of ergonomics but there is NO comparison between the Suzuki engine vs. the Honda Engine. The Vstrom has a much, much better engine.

The bike which surprised me the most was the Honda CB500X. That is a really nice all around town motorcycle. I could flat foot it easily and balance was decent. the Honda CB500X has a fantastic engine and would be a great weekend bike.

The nicest bikes at the display were the Indians. The Harleys looked good (they had a large display) but the Indians stole the show for the cruisers.
The best looking most expensive Cruiser in the USA: Indian.
Yes, Victory motorcycle was there but the Indian was the show stopper for the Harley boys.

Overall, My favorite non cruiser bikes based on my seat of the pants test were the following:

1. Honda CTX 1300 or Honda FB6 (Goldwing)
2. Burgman 650
3. Honda CB500X
4. Suzuki Vstrom 650

Cruisers:

1. Indian Chieftan (think Ferrari of Cruisers)
2. Kawasaki Vulcan
3. Suzuki C90T

I looked at the MSRP of all the bikes. If I didn't know the MSRP of the Burgman 650 I would guess $8500 and for the CTX 1300 I would guess $14K. Naturally, the bikes I am most likely to purchase are overpriced by multiple thousands.
 

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Discussion Starter #2

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Discussion Starter #3
By the way, a beautiful weekend here in Daytona Beach with weather in the upper 60's to low 70 degree F and sunny. A great day to put on a 100 miles and ride around the area after the bike display.
 

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Yeah the CB500X is a total treat for the money.
I think it's going to be a classic and there will be lots of aftermarket for it.
For a solo rider I think it can be a very good all arounder - light off road and I think can go the distance for touring. It's far more agile in town than any 650.

It has the same horsepower as a Burgman 650, decent luggage available, better gas mileage and way way lighter. Much fun to ride.

The suspension is better on the comfort side but not on the handling in the twists side so third party front shocks would be useful if you are over 200 lb.

Best bike I've demoed ever and my co-tester said he just wanted to point to the horizon and keep going.

Here is 160 pgs of real world on the CB500x
http://advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=840842&page=59

and you CAN do it up


http://advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=840842&page=56

71 mpg with this rig - might be be my long term Australia bike



My biggest dislike about the 650 were the side view mirrors. They seemed pretty poor compared to my 400 mirrors..
I'm surprised at that - positioning is different so might be a "getting used to" situation but I think the Burgman 650 mirrors are very well done tho eyebrow mirrors help with blindspots
You will adore the headlights on the 650 - some of the best in the business.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Honestly, the 3 bikes I liked the best at the Bike Week Display were the Burgman 650, Hondax CB500X and CTX 1300. I really liked the NC700 and if it had the Suzuki motor it would be a major contender.

If I could only own ONE bike it would be the Burgman 650 or CTX 1300 as the Honda CB500X isn't a real highway bike and I ride highways 20-30% of the time.

I had my Burgman 400 at 80 mph today and it was running nicely (indicated 86 mph).
 

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Discussion Starter #6
The Honda CB500X is one amazing bike for $6K. Clearly the best value for a new motorcycle. However, a 2012 Vstrom 650 can be purchased for under $9K brand new) so the gap between the $6800 CB500X and 2012 Vstrom is small.
But, I can't flat foot the Vstrom like I can the CB500X.

2 great bikes worth owning for the money. At $5,000 U.S. dollars (maybe a 1 year old CB500X) the Honda is the winner.
 

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Discussion Starter #7 (Edited)
For those of you looking for Goldwing light the CTX 1300 seems to be pretty close. I sat on both bikesand the CTX 1300 was comfortable. The deluxe version had ABS, stereo and Traction Control. It was super easy to flat foot the CTX 1300.

At $13K the CTX 1300 is great value but at $18K it is overpriced. I'm still looking to get a '13 Burgman 650 to keep next to my '12 Burgman 400. But, I'll likely get a CTX 1300 down the road and sell one of the Burgmans.

I think Honda should offer the DCT on the CTX 1300 as that would be a selling point to older riders wanting to down size from their Goldwings.
 

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I really liked the NC700
you haven't ridden one yet...not good value or design rev limited at 6500 rpm ...and over priced.

And if you have not experienced a DCT as yet - when you demo it - you will come back out and plant a fat kiss on the Burgman 650

Honda don't do automatics.

I don't see that the 500 would not do highway well as it has the same power as the Burgman 650 and is lighter plus larger wheels and it's top speed is well above the Burgmans.

Honda CB500X bikes for sale to see current asking prices. Engine size, 471 cc. Power, 47 bhp. Top speed, 125 mph ...
I had no issue keep up with larger bikes in the demo ride except for the sport models. You will have to stir the gearbox but there is a sweet spot around 6k that works very well. It feels and I think is very agile.

The 650 Vstrom is more powerful and better sprung than both but you need to be fairly tall to ride it comfortably. That bike will hustle and floats over rough pavement.

The stock ABS is an amazing feature on the CB500x
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Reviewers indicate the top end of a Honda CB500X and Burgman 650 are within 2-3 mph of each other. The Burgman is likely a more comfortable ride on the highway at 80 mph than the Honda CB500X.


Honda CB500X:

While the F and R were designed for a global average rider, the X is an ever-so-slightly bigger bike that aims to please the (taller) average European. Its seat is 25mm higher, its forks 20mm longer, its ground clearance 15mm higher, and its wheelbase 10mm longer. All of which makes for a bike that feels just little bit more grown up than the F. (Of course, at my not-so-towering 5’7”, it meant my heels were off the ground just enough to make manoeuvring the 195kg bike a watchful affair.)
It’s a comfortable bike – the handlebars curve up to meet your hands, instead of summoning them down to their level, and you sit upright on a wide and supple seat, looking down at an amber-lit dash (the F’s is blue and the R’s red) that offers such niceties as a clock and fuel consumption figures, but unfortunately, no gear position indicator.
The engine is the same 471cc, 47bhp parallel-twin that does duty in the F and the R. Though wearing a silver-coloured coating rather than black, it has the same untimidatingly linear power delivery, same brisk acceleration and torque-rich roll-ons, same approx-115mph top (I saw a max of 110) as its brothers. It’s a good, healthy engine – not madly exciting, but capable enough for most (sensible) needs, economical and forgiving.


Read more: http://www.visordown.com/road-tests-first-rides/first-ride-2013-honda-cb500x-review/22704.html#ixzz2vRECVrqJ
 

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If you can ride a standard motorcycle now (not cruiser style), i would suggest trying some other bikes like Triumph Tiger 800 or new BMW F 800 series whichever suits best. Only starting from that class would i consider a replacement for the Burgman
 

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Why?

I was not impressed with the BMWF800 on a demo ride including off road....it's big and heavy. 460 lbs - you can buy TWO CB500s for either of those.

The Tiger triumphs in the price war starting at $16,290 compared with the GS at $17,490. ABS costs an extra $1000 on the Triumph and $1150 on the BMW. But the BMW wins in the features list. It comes standard with a more comprehensive on-board computer with a convenient toggle button on the left handlebar, handgrip warmers, centre stand and self-canceling LED indicators.

The Tiger has standard plastic handguards but most adventure riders will probably opt for sturdier guards on both these models. BMW has also released a Triple Black ($17,715) with black forks etc and a GS Trophy edition ($17,990) with blue and white livery, black and grey seat, aluminium engine guard and solid hand protection bars.
now those are Aussie prices and who woudl take a triple off road???

I just don't get these bloated "adventure bikes"

Even the KLR650 is a handful off the beaten track and it's lighter with more low speed grunt being a thumper.

They have no fairing protection, more power than is needed and are top heavy.

The only good thing is the upright riding position.


I could never see either of those as a Burgman alternative.

The earlier BMW 650 Scarver was a contender - BMW had a good idea there - too bad they abandoned it -. so many forward looking features. It really is a do all machine and it's low seat height is very appealing.

Perhaps the most interesting part about the “Scarver” is that it feels like 4 bikes in one. Slightly motocross, part touring, sporty handling and cruiserish ambience.
For those of use who don’t have a pocket deep enough for 3-4 bikes, it may be the go.

http://www.roadcarver.com.au/2005/11/bmw-scarver-review/

Look how retro Yamaha is going with the 2015 SR400



I bet this Triumph will be popular as well



I'm not a Ducati fan but this motard style appeals..



450 lb wet -

New for 2013 is the Ducati Hyperstrada that is between the worlds of motard and touring. Decked-out with 50 liters of side luggage, a center stand and a touring windscreen Hyperstrada has been tailored for long journeys with 20mm taller handlebars, a wider and thicker seat and passenger grab handles. There are two 12V auxiliary power outlets to provide power for GPS units and heated vests. The suspension is also revived for touring duty with a shorter 5.9-inch stroke at both ends from the KYB fork and Sachs shock. Panigale-style 10-spoke wheels come wrapped with Pirelli Scorpion Trail tires to complete the package that weighs in at 399 pounds.
This is the engine size and HP I wish an updated Burgman 650 had.

It's really a shame the CB400F 2013 is not available outside Aus and Europe. Brilliant bike.



There is one here in Aus I'm lusting for but don't think I can swing the deal

440 Lb 45 HP and 18 ltr tank -

It's a Vtech so docile around town and little screamer in the twists...shades of RD400.

:(
 

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I see you like this design (cb500x, ducati motard etc) a lot. Not a big fan of it, i mean it's OK but nothing really special to me. Then somehow you always think in an adventure style, which is good! :) However twasn't implied that the aim is to knead the mud in some remote forest or explore the trails so there're more road oriented versions of both


and


Advantages are better stability down the road, suspension, power, sitting position, load capacity, luggage options, pillion accommodation, lights, ergonomics, brakes, protection, general endurance and road presence. Drawbacks - gas mileage and price.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Many of us Burgman riders rarely go offroad. While I like the styling of the Dual Purpose bikes I'm an on the road kind of guy.
That's why the B650 is so nice.
 

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My biggest dislike about the 650 were the side view mirrors. They seemed pretty poor compared to my 400 mirrors.

Unfortunately you not have own or tried 650 Burgie, mirror arrangement on 650 is one of best I have had, give you true vision quickly. That why you see this type of placement on bike such as Goldwing, ST 1300, CTX 1300, Kawasaki Concours, Victory Vision Tour and many more.
 

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design rev limited at 6500 rpm
So what...., the Burgman is rev limited to 8500 rpm.....the latest 600 engines are Rev Limited to a measly 16000 rpm....
Just because an engine has a low rev limit does not mean it will be slow, it will be geared accordingly.
The reason the NC700 revs lower is because it is a Long Stroke Engine.
It still gets down the road quite well with its lowly 6500 rpm

Andy
 

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Actually i never understood the mirrors on the 650 either. I remember always had to lean back and down to see the rear, and when sitting normally i was able to see only the mirror rim and nothing behind.

Regarding the rest, i agree Burgman is a very good touring rig
 

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Actually i never understood the mirrors on the 650 either. I remember always had to lean back and down to see the rear, and when sitting normally i was able to see only the mirror rim and nothing behind.

Regarding the rest, i agree Burgman is a very good touring rig
Ever think of readjusting them ! :p
 

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What i think are killing advantages of Burgie over conventional bike -

  • Luggage amenity - no pannier or box can substitute that.
  • Ease of operation - it's always a whole ritual procedure to get going on a motorcycle, you just jump and go with a Burgman.
  • Same down the road - automatic with releasing left lever for the brake which is more convenient location.
  • Element protection - one can go after swim right into saddle, whereas you definitely will need to dry out before riding a motorcycle in cooler winds. Water protection again is on a different level.
  • Sitting position - leg room is complete, one can probably go 1.5 times father without developing stiff body.
  • Possibly lowest COG in the business - the bike just steers itself, wherever you want to go - she already knows that.
  • Girls like the design a lot! :D
 

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Ever think of readjusting them ! :p
Yeah, the only way to readjust is to place where b400 mirrors are.

[edit] I see only the top of the mirror case, not the mirror, that is glass part of it. I can see the reflection either when adopting a cruiser sitting style or moving mirrors further ahead on rails which is not possible. With the 400 style i am able to see in whatever position including a sportbike one i.e. leaning forward and butt up :D
 

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Actually i never understood the mirrors on the 650 either. I remember always had to lean back and down to see the rear, and when sitting normally i was able to see only the mirror rim and nothing behind.

Regarding the rest, i agree Burgman is a very good touring rig
I couldn't believe what I just read so walked out side to take another look before I posted. This is a total myth. I could see the mirrors standing in front of the bike looking down thru the GIVI windshield from the front and still see the mirror. I couldn't quite adjust them far enough to see what was behind but from the seat there is no way I can get my head far enough forward for this to be true with the windshield mounted. Sitting on the seat with the adjustable mirrors there just is absolutely no way this is true. Now I wonder what the agenda is to post such a post?
 
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