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Discussion Starter #1
I'm having trouble joining the American Legion Riders because their rule is for a bike that is 500cc or greater. The rules have changed in the New York bylaws to "highway-legal motorcycle."

Does anyone know where I can find that it is "highway legal" in writing?

John
 

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If it were me and I got that reply I'd forget them, they aren't worth it.


Jim
 

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Highway means "A main road or thoroughfare, such as a street, boulevard, or parkway, available to the public for use for travel or transportation."

Therefore the expression "highway legal" would refer to a bike have a license tag on it and thereby legal to ride on a highway...
 

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The rules have changed in the New York bylaws to "highway-legal motorcycle." Does anyone know where I can find that it is "highway legal" in writing?
Each State has its own 'rules' as to what is legal on a state highway,
& what is legal on an interstate.....& sometimes those 'rules' are different.
Consult your own state Department Of Transportation for rules that apply
in your state, or in states you may ride in.
With 50 States....the lists of 'rules' could amount to many pages. :(
 

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They are almost certainly attempting to embrace the concept of: registered for street use + capable maintaining a certain minimum speed (usually > 40mph) + some minimum BHP (something like 5 or 7 BHP). At least every mention of "highway legal" I've come across identifies these three things. Whether that constitutes a truly highway legal vehicle is up for grabs. The Burgman meets or exceeds all of them and is actually highway capable. But to "prove" it.. I'm afraid you are faced with something akin to the age old definition of obscenity.
 

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They may simply trying to find a PC way to say "Something I won't be embarrassed to ride next to...:


Which is something else entirely.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
You guys missed the point. New York State American Legion changed the cc rule to "Highway capable," which basically means any motor vehicle with the DOT specified equipment (mirrors, headlight, etc.). NY AL is trying to make the rule broader to cover almost any type of motorcycle.

By the way, my Certificate of Origin from Suzuki says" Motorcycle" My NY State registration says "Motorcycle."

For those looking for classifications, I found this definition from NY DMV:

New York Moped and Scooter Classifications

The New York DMV defines all mopeds and scooters as fitting into one of three separate classifications, based on the top speed of each vehicle.

Each class comes with its own specific requirements and restrictions:

Class A reaches top speeds between 30 and 40 mph, requires a Class M or Class MJ license, and can operate in any traffic lane

Class B reaches top speeds between 20 and 30 mph, requires any class license, and can only operate in either the right-hand lane or along the shoulder

Class C reaches top speeds of 20 mph or less, requires any class license, and can only operate in either the right-hand lane or along the shoulder

John
 

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Y"Highway capable," which basically means any motor vehicle with the DOT specified equipment (mirrors, headlight, etc.).
Each class comes with its own specific requirements and restrictions:
I'm still confused on the issue, but based on your statement above, take it to the BMV and have an inspection done.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
I finally got a good explanation of why they have this standard. They use an independent organization to handle the Legacy and other runs. This organization has had past experience with riders who were over weight, had passengers who were over weight, and had luggage on the bike. They had accidents and reported that they couldn't stop. These motorcycles were 600cc and less. The organization determined that motorcycles that are 750cc and up have heavier suspension and heavier brakes than can handle extraordinary loads.
 

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I finally got a good explanation of why they have this standard. They use an independent organization to handle the Legacy and other runs. This organization has had past experience with riders who were over weight, had passengers who were over weight, and had luggage on the bike. They had accidents and reported that they couldn't stop. These motorcycles were 600cc and less. The organization determined that motorcycles that are 750cc and up have heavier suspension and heavier brakes than can handle extraordinary loads.
That is a rather broad generalisation, and a crock--very few if any 750's could handle two overweight passengers and luggage.

I would have said 74 in³...
 

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Maybe instead of basing it from bike's cc, it should be riders lb?
Jocky has to be small to ride the horse for the best speed and control.
If the riders are too big to handle the bike, or the combined weight is too high, they can't ride.
 

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That is a rather broad generalisation, and a crock--very few if any 750's could handle two overweight passengers and luggage.

I would have said 74 in³...
And some smaller bikes (like, say, a 650 Burgman) can.

They again...my wife's little Hyosung Comet will dust an 883 Sportster, 1/4 mile or top end!
 

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Choppers/Cruisers start from 1000 cc. This category is probably the only one where the rule applies -- the more the better. Until you can not lift the bike from ground anymore.
 

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Maybe instead of basing it from bike's cc, it should be riders lb?
Jocky has to be small to ride the horse for the best speed and control.
If the riders are too big to handle the bike, or the combined weight is too high, they can't ride.
I agree the standard could be as simple as "Can be safely ridden by the presenting rider and passenger, with their cargo, at highway speeds".
 

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And some smaller bikes (like, say, a 650 Burgman) can.

They again...my wife's little Hyosung Comet will dust an 883 Sportster, 1/4 mile or top end!
Sporty's don't count--they are arguably the worst motorcycle ever made, an "entry-level" Harley with all the disadvantages and none of the advantages of the big iron...
 
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