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Discussion Starter #1
I got my first non-manual clutched bike in 2011, when I got a Burgman 400. Because there was a lag between the time I gave the bike some throttle, and the moment when forward movement began, I was having some problems getting used to that lack of "control" of starting off.

Because of that, and because I wanted a larger Burgman that I could convert to a true trike someday, I got my present 2011 Burgman 650.

And now I'm having a problem getting used to the nearly instant throttle response while attempting to accelerate or slow down. I'm having problems controlling both the acceleration and slowing down, with the torque? of the engine-transmission reducing the speed as I approach an intersection or any time I want to gradually slow down.

The response is too quick and rapid...somewhat like when I was learning to drive a standard transmission car when I was 16. I'm afraid that I'm not going to be able to control the bike's lurching on loose gravel, or some other touchy riding situation.

I feel like an amateur (in fact, I am an amateur with this scooter), and while I've enjoyed the comfort and power of the 650 for the last 2600 miles, I'm getting tired of feeling like a "beginner" rider.

Is there anything that I can do or have done that will tame down this super sensitive throttle response, or is it just a design thing that I'll need to learn to live with?

Thanks for any input here, as I really don't have much mechanical understanding of the CVT and auto-shifting of this bike.
 

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Don't mean to point out the obvious, but make sure its NOT in "Power" mode. This exaggerates the throttle and engine braking response.

Second, you need to learn a gentle hand with the 650, this is not a beginners bike. Little inputs are all you need for starts and stops.

Last, this little trick might help. Learn to always cover the left (rear) brake with your hand. When you start out, give it just a little squeeze, this will tame the lurch forward and help moderate your low end speed. Slowly release the brake as you give it more gas. This is also a good skill to use for low speed maneuvering, around parking lots. Remember, only rear brake, not front. Keep it slightly engaged as you give little gas and you can ride 1mph all day long.

Hope this helps.
 

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What he said.

The ECVT is somewhat anticipatory as it figures out what you are doing next by your throttle motion.

Bit like flying a plane, small throttle inputs.

That said - the 650 is a bit impolite at lower speeds but that's one thing that turns it into a twisties burner that engine braking with the Power button on.

Practice and stay off gravel for now and stay light on the front brake at slow speeds...turn the bars and overdo the front brake even a tad will see you torqued over in a heart beat,
 

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When you go to slow down, don't totally close the throttle. Leave just a little throttle on while your speed drops then finish closing it when you get down below 10 mph. With practice you can make the bike feel like it is freewheeling. And as the others have said don't make quick changes in throttle. Roll it on and off smoothly like it were a rheostat.
 

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What I do is switch to manual mode after getting up to whatever speed I'm riding. When slowing down, I downshift when rpm's drop to around 2000-2200 and repeat until I'm near where I want to stop and press the manual button again to switch to auto. No harsh slowdown like rolling off totally in auto mode. What Buffalo said also works.....don't roll off the throttle completely. It definitely takes some time to get used to the CVT auto mode.
Practice away from traffic. You'll get the hang of it pretty fast I'm sure. Good luck!
 

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I've had no experience with one, but there is a device called a throttle tamer (g2ergo.com) that uses a cam to slow the initial response when you turn the throttle. I don't know if it would help equally with the engine braking.
 

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Scooterkal I had the same issues with the throttle that you are currently experiencing when I first got my 2011 650 Burg. Could not get used to that abrupt throttle after having ridden motorcycles for many years. Some members from this forum suggested the G2 throttle tamer to me, as some have suggested on the previous post. I would highly recommend this product and it will eliminate that abruptness you get with the throttle and make it easier to control the scoot during parking lot speed manuevers. It made all the difference in the world since like you I was ready to sell the Burg thinking I could never get used to the abruptness of the throttle. As for the engine braking time will cure this problem. You will eventually get used to the sudden deceleration of the bike when you let go of the thorttle and like others have suggested you will learn to control the throttle and not let it go immediately when decelarating. You will eventually begin to enjoy that decelaration and use it to your advantage on curvy roads. Switch it to power mode on the curves and you won't even have to ever touch the brakes as you enter the curves and be able to throttle out of them faster. I've attached a link to the G2 throttle tamer for you. On the options section put in Burgman for the selection to get the right part. Good luck and don't give up on that Burg yet. She is one **** of a great ride once you tame that throttle. http://www.g2ergo.com/store/g2-street-tamer-throttle-tube/
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I want to thank you all for your helpful replies. I haven't been taking advantage of all the electronic throttle controls on the Burgman 650, and so I always drive it in the Drive mode.

I've been really sensitive to my operating the throttle, since I know that really small inputs end in really effective outputs. I'll try some of your suggestions regarding covering the rear brake prior to starting off.

I think if the 650 wasn't so heavy to lift off the pavement, I probably wouldn't worry about the loose "footing" in some of the areas I can't avoid.
I took a ride with a scooter-riding friend who's used to riding across state lines in all kinds of weather, and we were going to a farm about 55 miles from home. Started off on two lane asphalt, then some gravel, and finally wet sand with ruts.

Sometimes, it's hard to take short trips and avoid all the loose road surfaces, and especially dicey with a larger bike. I think my legs are growing shorter or something, and I'm in need of riding boots with thicker soles on them so as to keep my feet planted flat on the ground in the rough.

I'll order the G2 throttle tamer this weekend, and was wondering if the Tamer would work with the "Break-Away" throttle lock?

Thanks again for your help here.
 

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It can be done electronically, too.

By feeding the CVT-controller an augmented speed signal, it shifts up sooner and downshifts later, greatly reducing the annoying low-speed engine braking.
 

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Use the throttle more like a rheostat instead of a gas pedal.

Slow deliberate inputs work best for me. I found acceleration is about the same using 1/4 throttle as full throttle.

The bike seems happier slowly reducing the throttle as opposed to closing it all the way.
 

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Scooterkal I had the same issues with the throttle that you are currently experiencing when I first got my 2011 650 Burg. Could not get used to that abrupt throttle after having ridden motorcycles for many years. Some members from this forum suggested the G2 throttle tamer to me, as some have suggested on the previous post. I would highly recommend this product and it will eliminate that abruptness you get with the throttle and make it easier to control the scoot during parking lot speed manuevers. It made all the difference in the world since like you I was ready to sell the Burg thinking I could never get used to the abruptness of the throttle. As for the engine braking time will cure this problem. You will eventually get used to the sudden deceleration of the bike when you let go of the thorttle and like others have suggested you will learn to control the throttle and not let it go immediately when decelarating. You will eventually begin to enjoy that decelaration and use it to your advantage on curvy roads. Switch it to power mode on the curves and you won't even have to ever touch the brakes as you enter the curves and be able to throttle out of them faster. I've attached a link to the G2 throttle tamer for you. On the options section put in Burgman for the selection to get the right part. Good luck and don't give up on that Burg yet. She is one **** of a great ride once you tame that throttle. http://www.g2ergo.com/store/g2-street-tamer-throttle-tube/
I checking the link, I see that throttle tamer is only listed for up to a 2012 Burgman 650. I'm wondering if that throttle issue was solved in the 2013 model?
 

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Use the throttle more like a rheostat instead of a gas pedal.

Slow deliberate inputs work best for me. I found acceleration is about the same using 1/4 throttle as full throttle.

The bike seems happier slowly reducing the throttle as opposed to closing it all the way.
Yup as it's not only controlling fuel/air flow but also the ECVT - I find it's weird to open the throttle part way to say 4,000 rpm and watch the speed steadily rise until drag = acceleration.
RPM stays the same.
Very difficult to explain to anyone.
 

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I checking the link, I see that throttle tamer is only listed for up to a 2012 Burgman 650. I'm wondering if that throttle issue was solved in the 2013 model?
They probably just haven't tested one, I'm betting its the same but them again with the new clutch/reprogrammed controller it might not need one.
 

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I have a 2013 and the only time I notice a lot of engine braking is at about 5 mph just before I come to a stop.
 

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It can be done electronically, too.

By feeding the CVT-controller an augmented speed signal, it shifts up sooner and downshifts later, greatly reducing the annoying low-speed engine braking.
Hi ErikDk,
I am interested too. Engine braking at low speed seems to be very annoying for me. What do you mean? Can you explain a bit better? Perhaps you are talking about SpeedoHealer or what else?
thanks
fausto
 

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Hi ErikDk,
I am interested too. Engine braking at low speed seems to be very annoying for me. What do you mean? Can you explain a bit better? Perhaps you are talking about SpeedoHealer or what else?
thanks
fausto
CVT shifting is based on vehicle speed and throttle so if you alter the speed signal it will change the shifting of the CVT. By increasing the speed signal the CVT will stay in a higher ratio reducing engine RPM's and the engine braking effect.
 

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CVT shifting is based on vehicle speed and throttle so if you alter the speed signal it will change the shifting of the CVT. By increasing the speed signal the CVT will stay in a higher ratio reducing engine RPM's and the engine braking effect.
Thank you MJR, but If I alter the speed signal to the CVT, the speed indicated by the speedo will not be also altered? :confused:
byebye
 

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Thank you MJR, but If I alter the speed signal to the CVT, the speed indicated by the speedo will not be also altered? :confused:
byebye
The speed signal wire is split, one wire goes to the speedometer, the other to the CVT-controller part of the ECU.

Like I write in my very long signature line(s): I have one SpeedoHealer deducting from the speed signal to make the speedometer show the actual speed, and an other SpeedoHealer adding to the speed signal to make the CVT shift up earlier.

In the 2013's and forward they fixed the CVT, so you can go less than 3k rpm and generally less rpm vs speed, but they figured no-one needs an accurate speedometer, so they made it analog with a scale to 200 kph for a scoot that struggles to reach 150 kph.
 
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