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TL,DR: I like it a lot, but it's not a "real" bike.

I've owned my 2011 Burgman 400 for 11 months now. I retired a BMW R1100S; If I were half my 66 years, I'd still love the S, but age takes its toll. I've ridden the 400 a tick over 2000 miles, almost all of it running errands. That's more than I rode the S in a year. I rode in NH USA through November, missed Dec. and Jan., rode 3 times in February and now the good weather is here.

It has a much more comfortable seat and riding position and is so much fun it begs to be ridden. That's what I was hoping for. The CVT automatic took a few rides to get used to. The engine revs while taking off, higher than the speed you gain. Then it stays near red-line while the bike picks up speed. Stopping is another Ooops-that-clutch-is-now-a-brake moment. And you expect it to stall when you stop, but it doesn't. It is surprisingly quick off the line. It easily outpaces most cars from a stop light, not that I tried. Rather, I didn't try to go slow. I got in the habit of twisting the grip all the way, and letting the CVT and brains figure out how fast to go. Once up to speed, I back off the throttle and just cruise along. Brakes are very good. It has linked brakes and ABS, so I've never felt I needed more. I really like being able to shift my feet around. There are floorboards to set your feet down directly below you, and as you slide your feet forward for more room, you eventually hit the angled floorboard that lets you stretch your leg out. Often I have one foot down and one foot out forward. Gas mileage is another boon. If I hyper-miled it, I could get over 60 MPG, but in my mixed riding (1/2 NH backroads, 1/2 interstate) I get 55-58 MPG.

The Good: I am amazed at how darn practical it is. The under-seat storage swallows a sh!t-ton of stuff. Add in the rear top-case and I've put almost a whole grocery cart worth of food and soda in it. I'm amazed the under-seat storage will swallow 3 12-packs of soda. The top case (Givi 36 liter) will take a fourth. The 400 will do 85 on the highway, but is more comfortable at 70-75. It is at its best on back roads (or in the city; my city is only 40,000 people, so it's more like a town). If I lived in a big city, it would be my only vehicle. The step-through is appreciated, though I don't always step-through. I like the no-shifting aspect of the ride; sacrilege I know. MPG is pretty darn good. I added a bigger, stiffer Givi fairing, so the weather protection is first class. No buffeting of the head, no wet legs in the rain. The pillion seat looks comfy, but I've had no pillion on it. The cluster lighting is amazing. It seems to be off in the day, but drive through a tunnel or tree-lined lane and it lights up red, as it does at night, all very legible. Access to the battery to add a battery tender pigtail was easy; it's behind a one or two bolt pop-out cover in the bin. The bins, two small bins and one long, large bin, add to the storage and are convenient for smaller items. I'm impressed.

The Bad: it's not a motorcycle. At least, it doesn't handle like one. I'm well aware of its limitations, yet I've still bottomed it out and scraped hard parts a few times; more when I first got it, as I've recalibrated my "limit" sensor. Yeah, it's a short list of Bad.

Will I keep it? Maybe. I could see adding a 2nd "standard" or "adventure" bike like a CB500X for more comfortable ergos, but I'm trying to cut down on the bike count. I could see replacing it with a TMax, which has 15" wheels and is more a sportbike in a scooter body. I'd give up some storage, but I'd gain more fun in the twisties. But for now, it's a keeper.

The 400 pretty much what I expected it to be, an easy to mount, easy to ride, fun bike that can take on any paved road. But even though it's better than I expected, it still isn't a "real" bike.
 

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Nice write up....test ride a B650 for a more Real Bike Feel.
 

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Nice write up....test ride a B650 for a more Real Bike Feel.
Thanks. I did my research. Those who have had both said they missed their B400s. The B650 was compared to a Goldwing. I thought I'd find a sportier ride in the smaller scooter. The Tmax reviews say it's the most bike-like of the mega-scooter. I'll hold on to the B400 for a while.
 

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Cool.... I wasn’t telling you to get rid of your B400 but to experience the smooth quiet power band of the B650. I did my research and this site helped me :
 

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Agree with pretty much all that. Just by the nature of the step through frame it won't be as rigid as a standard MC, and then you have the smaller wheels... The 2018+ models have a slightly larger front wheel and claim to have a more rigid frame setup, so it would be interesting to do a comparison.

A big factor in the handling is the tire age and condition. When I recently went from the original worn tires on my 2011 to new Pirellis, it made a big difference in the handling. The bulk of my riding is twisty back roads so it really improved the fun factor.

You mentioned the brakes were linked, but I didn't think that is the case on these, at least never saw any claims of that in any of the manuals or advertising.
 

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The standard front fork springs are too soft, after installing progressive with a higher end rate, i've yet to see them bottoming out.
 

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Just the springs and played a bit with oil viscosity, as find emulators' regular price quite steep, besides they recommend linear springs for their product, and i'm a bit more European school camper.

Incidentally, a little life hack for fork stand that might be useful at service -- takes less than 5 min to make. Doesn't require that precision, just copied caliper read ;)
 

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I think you hit the nail on the head. "how darn practical it is!"
 

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TL,DR: I like it a lot, but it's not a "real" bike.
Stopping is another Ooops-that-clutch-is-now-a-brake moment. And you expect it to stall when you stop, but it doesn't.
But even though it's better than I expected, it still isn't a "real" bike.
I'm close enough to your age that I can tell, you need to GET RID OF YOUR BURGMAN 400😝🤪😛. This is nothing personal against you as I don't know who you are and this is the only post I read from you. YOU'RE A MOTORCYCLE MAN, so get rid of the Scooter and stop trying to justify buying the Burgman 400.

Anytime I see a YouTube on the Burgman 650 or 400, I automatically give a "Thumb Down(n)" to all YouTube videos who say what you say below. It is someone with a 'confidence problem' not riding a motorcycle.
Stopping is another Ooops-that-clutch-is-now-a-brake moment.
If you don't have the confidence from within to own a Burgman 650 or 400 sell it! You won't say the same thing if you had a Honda 'Dual Clutch' 1800 Goldwing, African Twin Adventure bike, etc. Recently I had the dilemma to buy a new motorcycle. I was looking at the Suzuki SV650, Harley 883 Iron, Honda Adventure 500, Honda Shadow 750 Aero. I even looked into the CanAm Ryker. I didn't like the seating position of the SV650. I loved the seating position of the Harley 883 Iron after taking it for a ride through the Harley dealership, this was one of my favorites. The Honda Rebel 500 seating position is also great with a better seating position than the Harley 883. The Honda Shadow 750 also has a great seating position, but not as good as the Harley 883 or Honda Rebel.

I was looking for a replacement for my Honda Goldwing 1800, that I bought new -but it was terrible for stop-and-go traffic, splitting lanes, --great for touring so I sold it with over 20,000 miles.

Forget about being practical😁! Get something that doesn't remind you that you are on a scooter and constantly having to remind yourself of being practical.

I highly suggest you look into the Harley 883 Iron, Honda Adventure, Rebel 500, Honda Shadow 750 Aero. No one ever complains about the CanAm Ryker not having a clutch so if you don't feel comfortable on a motorcycle, the CamAm Ryker can be bought at a practical price(600cc/900cc).

Don't be practical at our age! I sold my Burgman 650 for my BMW R1200R. The BMW R1200 series is just as practical with side cases and top box as my Burgman 650.
When it comes to motorcycles, I'M NOT PRACTICAL:love:! After putting 20,000+ miles on my BMW R1200R, I sold it because the shop could not sell my Burgman 650(I bought back my B650 and sold my R1200). My Burgman 650(I still own) is smoother than my R1200 -both could cruise an indicated 85+mph all day with enough power to pass other cars if needed. The BMW suspension is definitely better, so was the suspension on my BMW F800 which has a better seating position than my R1200. I didn't like the idea of the BMW F800 leaking oil and sold it when the shop couldn't fix the leak.

TIME TO BUY YOURSELF A REAL MOTORCYCLE!
(Believe it or NOT: Many sports car enthusiasts don't want to buy a Sports Car, unless it has a stick shift and 6 forward gears and a clutch.)
 

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I bought my 2011 Burgman 400 with 6600 miles on it, and it now has about 22200 miles on it. I like it a lot. Before that I had a 2006 Burgman 400 that I had put about 6000 miles on. Like you said, the Burgman 400 has a boatload of storage built in, and I added a Bestem 929 topcase for even more storage (moved the topcase from the 2006 to the 2011 Burgman 400). Like you, I've scraped the hard parts numerous times, especially riding 2-up. At this point, though, my lean calibration is pretty well tuned; I lean lots of turns at what is probably less than an inch from scraping the center stand. The Burgman is my go-to street bike. I also have a 2017 Versys-X 300 that I've only had for about 6 months. It is very manageable as well. Fairly light and easy to manhandle if I need to. After going back and forth between bikes for several months now, I don't have the clutch vs brake issue. I sort of naturally adapt. The Burgman is great around town, but I keep the Versys-X 300 at a cabin we own, and it is much better on the poorly maintained gravel/dirt roads I regularly encounter there. Lots of options for you. Enjoy. Have fun. Welcome to the forum!
 
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