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Discussion Starter #1
Feel freel to answer 1 or all. Thanks! Just picking your brain for our opinion.
Just go my scoot 2 weeks ago. Want to change various bulbs to LEDs. Anyone have a parts/swap list? Are all parts from 2007 and up the same?

I live in San Diego,CA. This is my new daily driver. Work is 38 miles RT

Is there a way to put the 650 mirrors on a 400?
What's the best oil to use?
Is it worth it to get into the whole amsoil thing?
Oil filter factory or aftermarket?
Air filter K&N?
What helps MPG the most? Other than coasting down hill. Lol

If you had 5 scooter tools/parts to keep on the scoot at all times what would they be?
If you had 5 gagets at all times?
What where your first 5 mods and would you do it again?
Worst mistake/s?
Do's & Don't's?
 

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Won't say you couldn't put the 650 mirrors on a 400 but it would take a lot of work including extensive body modificatons.

As the 400 does not have a wet clutch you can use any oil you want to in it. Just follow the weight ratings in the owners manual for your weather conditions.

Amsoil is good oil but over priced in my opinion. It's more marketing hipe than anything else again in my opinion.

Factory filters are fine as are a number of after after market ones. I use Wix filters just because I can get them at the autoparts store right down the road.

I feel about the same way about K&N filters as I do Amsoil.

Driving style has more to do with mpg than anything else.
 

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Re: MPG, the only time I get over 60mpg is when I'm cruising backroads in the 50-60 mph range. For freeway speed commutes, if I keep my rpm's at 6000 (65-70 mph), I'll average in the mid to upper 50's mpg. MPG starts taking a big hit when I cruise at 70+ mph. In-town stop & go takes a chunk out of mpg, too.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thank you guys! I'm really surprised that more people did chime in. I threw out a bunch of questions/options; didn't want to make 20 different posts. I figured people could pick and chooses what they wanted to comment on. :(

Now I know my mission! As soon as I get familiar with my scoot, I will be resounding to questions and post frequently. For now I will just add my 40 years of general knowledge and positive encouragement to what I do know!
Thanh you to theses who commented. :thumbup:
 

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Your MPG is a little puzzling to me. My 2008 400 when riding back roads at around 50ish MPH will get in the low 70's mpg. It drops off sharply at higher speeds but never into the 50's. I changed out the rollers on my bike to DR. Pulley sliders and they made a change in MPG...most people get better mileage but I lost a few mpg.(The mileage listed earlier was pre sliders) They do offer more performance and I am heavy throttled so it doesn't surprise me, as the only place one would think they should get better MPG is on the high end as RPM's are lowered at the range. They are higher at lowered ratios.
 

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Goonie, your post has only been up for 8 hours (and only 4 since the sun came up on the West Coast). Some of use are just getting back from our morning rides! :D
 

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Deedah - the disparity in MPG among our Burgman 400 riders has always been a head-scratcher for me. I've averaged in the mid 50's on both my '05 and '08 bikes in mixed city/freeway driving. I tour on my 650, so I haven't had my current 400 on a long roadtrip - but I'm tempted to devote a tankful to a controlled 50 mph backroad cruise experiment. What percentage of your riding is in-town (stop lights, stop/go traffic, etc)? What kind of terrain do you ride? (I ride quite a bit in the local canyons and mountains - full of tight twisties and elevation changes). Sometimes I think it's my California gasoline blend. As I said, it's a mystery to me.
 

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jeff_MDR said:
Deedah - the disparity in MPG among our Burgman 400 riders has always been a head-scratcher for me. I've averaged in the mid 50's on both my '05 and '08 bikes in mixed city/freeway driving. I tour on my 650, so I haven't had my current 400 on a long roadtrip - but I'm tempted to devote a tankful to a controlled 50 mph backroad cruise experiment. What percentage of your riding is in-town (stop lights, stop/go traffic, etc)? What kind of terrain do you ride? (I ride quite a bit in the local canyons and mountains - full of tight twisties and elevation changes). Sometimes I think it's my California gasoline blend. As I said, it's a mystery to me.
I have had more than one person tell me that some of the blends in California get worse MPG...makes you wonder if they are providing any believable pollution decrease. IE 10% less MPG=10% more gas burned = more pollution. Not too mention the added expense and pollution in their creation.....wait I am heading down a tangent I don't want to go down...
 

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don't believe I ever did 5 mods , but givi shield and made my own body shields, air inlet mods for clutch, foot boards, not pegs
worst mistake, leaving the under seat light bulb in, second worst, not learning about the key turning back too far soon enough
 

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Discussion Starter #10
jeff_MDR said:
Goonie, your post has only been up for 8 hours (and only 4 since the sun came up on the West Coast). Some of use are just getting back from our morning rides! :D
I've got to press! Lol
Your right. I was egging on to get some more active participation.
Thanks guys!
 

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Goonie said:
Feel freel to answer 1 or all. Thanks! Just picking your brain for our opinion.
Oil filter factory or aftermarket?
Air filter K&N?
What helps MPG the most? Other than coasting down hill. Lol

If you had 5 scooter tools/parts to keep on the scoot at all times what would they be?
If you had 5 gagets at all times?
What where your first 5 mods and would you do it again?
Worst mistake/s?
Do's & Don't's?
Oil Filter - As far as I know, there are some fine aftermarket oil filters. However, there have been a lot of concerns written regarding Fram oil filters but, I don't recall the details. I just avoid them.

MPG - If the great majority of you riding is within a narrow speed band, specific slider weights would likely best impact your fuel mileage. However, where they will help within a certain range, at other times they can hurt so, consider this carefully and do a lot of research.

K&N - You can get a K&N on eBay cheaper than a OEM air filter. Have to also get the cleaning solution and recharge oil but, these can also be found on eBay cheap and last multiple applications. Lots of dollars saved over time. K&N sometimes arrive warped and makes it difficult to get the air box top on securely. Hold back part of filter frame in boiling water a minute and it softens up nicely and makes fitting easier (or, check on arrival and immediately send back for replacement if defective...I realized the problem too late).

Tools/parts - (Besides OEM tools or better quality replacements): Fire extinguisher, package of Lemon Pledge wipes, tire repair stuff (small 12v tire pump, repair kit, bottle of Slime - sorry if lumping these is cheating), bottle of oil, short, light-duty jumper cables (don't need to be long since you can always roll bike to a car's battery side). Also make sure your fuse box has fuses in the "spare" slots.

Gadgets - Cell phone, phone mount (for when using phone for GPS or tunes) with power to phone "permanently" routed through front of bike, "shorty" 12v USB outlet (allows plugging in of charge cord with glove box door closed), communications set (my wife and I have ScalaRider G4's and like them - helmet to helmet up to a mile, blue tooth with phone/gps, built in FM radio).

Mods - This is going beyond 5 but, I would not do without any of them: Grip Puppies, side deflectors, Givi Airflow windscreen, Bestem 929 T-Box with DIY electrical contacts (don't have to manually plug/unplug wires), "homemade" tunnel bag (re-purposed camera bag) which serves as rain suit storage and insulated CUP HOLDER, Givi 479 saddle bags (with only the buckle strap going across the trunk, and the Velcro straps attached to mating Velcro straps adhered and screwed to the trunk side walls to minimize blocking trunk access), 19 g Dr Pulley slider weights, DIY backrest (somewhat like the Isuzu style). I would do all of these again, with a couple of caveats. My Givi bags have single access zippers. These bags replaced a cheap set of Rally Pack bags. The Givi's are larger, look and "hang" much nicer but, I prefer the double zippers on the Rally Packs as it makes access much more convenient. I haven't yet had the bike out in all the conditions I want to experience the Dr Pulley sliders in so, haven't made a final decisions on them. Finally, I'm not getting all the functionality I expected from my ScalaRiders. I haven't contacted the company to find out if I am doing something wrong or, if what I am experiencing is simply a limitation of the set (being able to listen to the radio and have intermittent voice communication with the paired headset). Still, I'm pretty happy with everything and consider each piece a great investment and addition.

Mistakes - *Dropping the bike. Even at low speed, the cost of plastic on these things plus a couple of chrome parts adds up fast (if ever in need, Shopzilla has very good prices on OEM parts). *Not thoroughly researching the Givi side bags and realizing they had the single zippers (may not have been a deal breaker after researching alternatives but, I was miffed at myself for missing it). *Purchasing a three-season mesh riding jacket a little small (could wear it year-round if enough room to get inner jacket on under it) with 3/4 sleeves (I think I would have preferred full-length sleeves but, am not sure as this is the only riding jacket I've owned) in black (it looks cool and the reflective parts really stand out for visibility but, could be "cooler" in hot weather). *Not including pants when I was initially acquiring safety gear, and one of my knees suffered from it.

Do - *Take a riding safety course if you haven't done so. *Use head to toe safety gear: Good helmet, hearing protection, gauntlet gloves, armored jacket and pants (I recently purchased some Slider jeans and like them) and over the ankle footwear (I've got some watrproof Merrel hiking shoes with Vibrum soles, and wear them all the time). *Presume people don't see you. *Carry gear for the various weather conditions you may encounter, including rain gear. Being uncomfortable can spoil an otherwise glorious ride. *Pay attention to weather forcasts to avoid getting stuck when roads ice up. *Especially if your bike is black, accessorize it with "super black" reflective tape. It blends well with the plastic but, reflects white. *Learn to do as much as your bike maintenance as you can. Here, I would include some plastic repair. When I dropped my bike, I saved enough by repairing the plastics and having them painted, plus ignoring some minor scratches on chrome parts that I had enough left over from the insurance settlement to almost cover the cost of buying a second bike (which we did, for my wife). *Ride often and go on adventures. *Enjoy the mental picture you know people have when you tell them you ride a scooter, and their reactions when you whip out a picture of it.

Don't - *Drop your bike if you can help it. Avoid the front brake going slow and turning (Maintain slow control such as in a U-turn by keeping revs steady and high enough to partially engage the clutch (4000 rpm) and limiting speed with rear brake.) *Ride on loose gravel. *Not do any of the stuff in the "Do" heading. *Ever loose your Burgman grin!
 

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My best purchase was a quality riding jacket. It's waterproof, has some proection, tough fabric, comfortable, and can adapt through vent zippers from about 80* down to 50*. Mine is a Klim Tomahawk, my dealer has leftovers for half price.
But at least get some easy access rain gear and put it on before you get wet.
I just bought a K&N, so if it's not too loud (intake noise) to me it's a no brainier seeing an OEM disposable is about the same price.
I have a Bestem tunnel bag that I like, and just bought some Nelson Riggs saddle bags that I haven't had the chance to put them on my bike yet.
Cruise control is nice, but next time I'd go with a Throttle Miester.
Helmet, wear it! Gloves too for Bees, gravel and bugs.
 
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