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Discussion Starter #1
Hello I am a new member, but I currently own an 2005 400, and a 2006 650. I have 30K on both of them. The 400 has a horrible, very loud rattle only when sitting and idling, it is so loud that you can not carry on a conversation close to the bike. That noise goes away when you pull away from the stop, the noise comes from the right rear housing. It has been going on for about the last 3,000 to 5,000 miles. Any ideas???
 

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No idea on what the noise is but: How bad would it have to get before you stopped riding it and actually tried to find out the cause???
Something minor, left unchecked, could easily become dangerous to ride and expensive to repair.
I wouldn't ride it until the cause was determined.
You're luckier than most; you've got another scoot to ride.
 

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The noise is probably one of two things.

It could just be baffles inside the muffler that have broken loose. Welds in the muffler are notorious for cracking. When they do the baffles come loose and rattle around inside the muffler. Take the muffler off and shake it around. If the baffles are loose you will hear them.

The other possibility is the bearing on the clutch idler shaft between the clutch and the wheel. These are also notorious for going bad. There are a couple of ways to test to see if this is it. One is to push the bike around with the engine off and see if you hear a grinding sound as the rear wheel turns. The other is to put the bike on the center stand and start the engine. Listen as you speed the engine up until the clutch engages. If the noise goes away when it engages then it is the idler bearing.
 

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30,000 miles on a '05-400???
I'm betting on the muffler baffles..
it was like that on mine at about
30,000 miles...time for a replacement.
I chose a Leo Vince4Road from
www.scooterwest.com
All stainless steel..no rust.
Not obnoxious loud either.
Cheaper price that a Suzuki OEM.
 

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30,000 miles on a '05-400???
I'm betting on the muffler baffles..
it was like that on mine at about
30,000 miles...time for a replacement.
Mines shot on my 2004 also. But I like the sound, so I threw on some new paint and I'm set for now.
 

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One fellow that had the shop resources
showed pictures of how he cut the back-end
out, did some internal 'modifications', & then
welded he back-end on again, & painted it
with paint for a BBQ cooker.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
No idea on what the noise is but: How bad would it have to get before you stopped riding it and actually tried to find out the cause???
Something minor, left unchecked, could easily become dangerous to ride and expensive to repair.
I wouldn't ride it until the cause was determined.
You're luckier than most; you've got another scoot to ride.
Hello daBurgMan, I'm sorry I should have supplied a little more information in my first post, but it took me about 20 min just to figure out how to post a message, on this forum, I do not spend much time on computers. I live in Wa state, my 400 is kept at my fathers house in Southern Missouri, I only get to spend 2 weeks a year with it and my Dad, who is in his 80's. My Dad loves to ride he has an 2006 Yamaha Majesty 400. Riding time is precious during those 2 weeks, because my Dad will no longer ride more than 30 miles without a partner (all 30K miles were put on the scoot in 2 week segments since 2006) we do all our own maint. Last year I replaced the belt for the first time, and the weights, at that time we tried very hard to figure out the rattle, with no luck. I have had the muffler off several times, and there is very little rattle. Safety is first but, Riding time is the priority,the life of the bike is secondary, I have no idea how many more 2 week times my Dad has to ride. I do understand how important maintaining your machinery is, these are my only two scooters, but I ride 4 other motorcycles, and average 20K miles a year on two wheels. I do ALL my own maint. to include any and all tire changes, carb balances, whatever needs done, I do not trust dealerships. I started riding at 16, and now am 61, and have owned and maintained motorcycles all of that time.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
The noise is probably one of two things.

It could just be baffles inside the muffler that have broken loose. Welds in the muffler are notorious for cracking. When they do the baffles come loose and rattle around inside the muffler. Take the muffler off and shake it around. If the baffles are loose you will hear them.

The other possibility is the bearing on the clutch idler shaft between the clutch and the wheel. These are also notorious for going bad. There are a couple of ways to test to see if this is it. One is to push the bike around with the engine off and see if you hear a grinding sound as the rear wheel turns. The other is to put the bike on the center stand and start the engine. Listen as you speed the engine up until the clutch engages. If the noise goes away when it engages then it is the idler bearing.
Thanks Buffalo, I think you may have hit the nail on the head, with your 2nd suggestion, I have done those very things, and it does just what you describe,please read the reply I made to daBurgMan, as it was long winded but may explain why I let the scooter go so long. My riding time is coming up at the end of the month, so I have to try to get a bushing ordered so I can make the repair. Thanks again. If I fix the problem I will let you know.
 

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The good news is that bearing is only turning when the clutch is not engaged. When you are moving the shaft it rides on is locked in place by the clutch. That means you don't have to be in a big hurry to fix it. The worse thing that could happen is that it could seize to the shaft. If that happened the clutch would not disengage and the engine would die when you came to a stop.

It is simple to change. Best time to do it is when you do a belt change because you have to pull the belt off. Once you have the belt off remove the nut that holds the secondary pulley/clutch assembly on. Pull the whole assembly off and turn it over so you can see the back side. You will find the bearing in the end of the hollow center shaft. You don't have to take the pulley/clutch assembly apart to replace the bearing. Use a long punch or screwdriver through the shaft from the front side to drive the bearing out. Clean everything up and grease the new bearing. A little extra grease inside the shaft wouldn't hurt anything either. Press or tap the new bearing in and put the CVT back together.

The bearing in question is item #11 on this fiche http://www.partshark.com/oemparts/a/suz/508c04c4f870020498e368df/transmission-1
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Thanks again, I changed the belt last year, at 30K, that is more than double the recommended mileage, but as down time eats up precious riding time I just thought I would test how long the belt would last. Figuring worst case was it broke, then I would have to take time to fix it, but all the worn belt did was cause the RPM's to rev a little higher when pulling away from the stop. I have always been a big road bike rider, never thought I would be interested in riding or owning a scooter. Then I got the 400 to ride with my Dad, and it handled like an F-15 fighter, and I loved it. So when I went back to Washington state I was shopping for a scooter to have there, I made one miscalculation though, I thought if a 400 is fun, a 650 should be more fun. Well the 650 is fun, but the 400 handles much quicker and is still more fun. I made a few changes to the 650, I put a set of 136db car horns on it, in the middle of the windshield where the S is I mounted a 100w Hella off road light, and I mounted a set of 400 mirrors on the handle bars, I also put a set of risers on the handlebars that raised them about an inch, and set them back about the same. I wear Tri-focals so the regular mirrors took to long for me to find in my glasses, the off road light was not because I needed more light to see, but it was so I would be seen. At the time I road into Seattle, on the freeway at night, had done so for years, on my bigger bikes and maybe would get cut off by cars once or twice a year, but when I started riding the scooter, in the same way, and same route, I was getting cut off about twice or three times a week. It took me awhile to figure it out, but one day I parked the scoot behind my wife's Honda Accord and set in her car and had her sit on the scoot and I discovered the head light on the scoot was below the level of her rear window/trunk. So I mounted the off road light, (aimed it so the beam was lower then my low beam), but because the light sits higher People could now see me when they made quick lane checks before changing lanes. Oh I also changed to a taller Givi windshield and cut it down so it was the correct height, just below my line of sight.
 
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