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Discussion Starter #1
Besides the already well documented differences in the 05 models and previous years here are some interesting spec. differences taken from the 05 service manual versus the 04.

Dry Mass:
AN650K5----------------AN650AK5---------------AN650K4
235 kg (518 lbs)-------243 kg (535 lbs)-------238 kg (524 lbs)

There are also small differences in the piston diameter, piston ring end gap and a new Immobilzer indicator light (LED).

It would be interesting to know where they were able to trim the weight?
 

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If you've got both service manuals, then perhaps there's a good exploded parts diagram in each where you can look for differences. Usually weight is shed by changing materials. Plastic for a metal trim part. Aluminum for a steel frame or engine part. They might also change to a thinner walled tubing in areas of the frame that were over-engineered.

Look for parts that look the same, but have new numbers in '05. Look for parts from '04 missing in the '05 manual.

Good luck. Tell us what you find out. I'm curious too.

Dave B.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Roy, same as the 04, Variable change (1.800 - 0.465). All of the drive train specs. for the 05 show the same as the 04. Are you thinking that the OD feature may be software driven???
 

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Interesting, if the specs in the manual are correct, it supports what the Suzuki rep said at BikeWeek. The OD was only added to the manual mode to make it the same as the auto mode and nothing really changed except they added a display to show it.

I would guess that if the transmission final radio is the same, electronics would not change anything. Maybe someone who is more mechanically knowledgeable can answer that.
 

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A computer controls the CVT and can make the engine run at whatever RPMs it wants to relative to the rear wheel speed. The "final drive" in the 650 is a sequence of inline gears that simply transfer the output of the CVT to the wheel. There is no gear changing in the conventional sense like you have with a typical transmission.

The computer "knows" how fast the engine should be run to give you the performance you want. It changes engine/wheel ratios infinitely as you accelerate and deccelerate to make sure the engine runs at an RPM that gives it the power needed. When you throttle back to cruise it measures that intent and moves the engine into a cruising RPM. Let's call this the "power profile". Press the POWER button and it gives you a DIFFERENT power profile, with higher engine RPMs at any given speed. With higher RPMs at any speed you have more potential energy to move and pass or climb quickly with. The cost is lower gas mileage.

The 650 is a HEAVY bike, but has plenty of power to move it and you along. In it's first few years of production Susuki noticed more than a few complaints about how poor of gas mileage it got. Combine that with the rising trend in gas prices and you have a reason for them to rethink the "power profile" of the 650. The overdrive "gear" in the '05 650 is just another power profile. It lets the engine run at a LOWER RPM while cruising. This saves gas, but looses that potential for quick passes and climbs. It is all done with the computer, minutely controlling the expansion and contraction of the CVT pulleys. It's there for the gas-price-conscious buyers who may not have bought an 03 or 04 650 because of it's poor mpg compared to smaller scooters.

The overdrive in the '05 650 was the only selling point the Salina, KS Suzuki dealer pushed on me. He was very confident it would make his '05 650 easier to sell than his previous year models had been, and as such he wouldn't negotiate on it's price. Most of my riding has been and will be in town, where the overdrive power profile is useless. If I'd wanted a commuter with 120 mile highway commutes each day then I'd have paid more to get an overdrive '05 with that "economy" profile.

Just so you'll know... With computer control of the 650's performance, Suzuki could tweak those profiles any way they want. If gas prices drop drastically, the overdrive mode on a new '07 650 may actually run at higher RPMs than it does on an '05. If Canadian riders prefer a more energetic performance, for example, then 650s sold in canada may have a higher RPM DRIVE (automatic) mode than 650s sold in the US. Italian 650s may have a different profile. Chinese 650s may have another. In other words, the power/performance/economy profiles of the 650 might be different for every different market.

Now, do we know yet where the weight went in the '05?
 

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lilleyen said:
No wonder my Exec feels heavy.
9 lbs extra!
650 = Lardy

Exec = Lardy Ass!

:lol:

Seriously though, 9Ibs aint bad - as that covers:

1. Motors for the wing mirrors.
2. Motors for the screen
3. Controls for the above
4. ABS system complete
5. An OD symbol on the Dash
6. A plastic Executive sign for each side of the bike.
 

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NormanB said:
lilleyen said:
No wonder my Exec feels heavy.
9 lbs extra!
snipped
Seriously though, 9Ibs aint bad - as that covers:

1. Motors for the wing mirrors.
2. Motors for the screen
3. Controls for the above
4. ABS system complete
5. An OD symbol on the Dash
6. A plastic Executive sign for each side of the bike.
Do the Executive signs carry that much weight? :wink:
 

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I also noticed mine drops RPM when I'm cruising at 60-65 MPH and I switch to manual and bump it up into overdrive. I was wondering if anyone has tried that on the interstate to see if puts itself into an overdrive ratio in auto or if it still drops when you switch to manual.

If I'm on the highway for any length of time I go for manual overdrive. I don't know if this is saving any gas as grabbing too high of a gear can also lug the engine and use more. I'd like to think I am.
 

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I'd think that at that speed O/D would save you money by maintaining speed with less rpm's. I'd think that if you were lugging the engine to the point of excessive fuel consumption, you'd know it.
This O/D issue has come up before. If I recall, the consensus was that the scooter would shift into OD when set at automatic if a high enough speed was attained. That's what I recall, but I don't have any hands on experience there.
 

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Interesting that the '05 ABS bike only weighs a kilo less than the '04 ABS. I'm guessing the windshield motor accounts for the smaller difference....
 
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