Suzuki Burgman USA Forum banner

1 - 16 of 16 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Just recently bought a 2004 650. Guy I bought it from put a brand new battery, starter, and fuel pump in it. It has ran well for two or three days but today while riding it cut off. Kill switch is off and kickstand is up. When I hooked up cables to jump it off it started right away. As soon as I turned it off and tried again it won't start again. Not sure where to begin. Thanks
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
884 Posts
Possibly regulator/rectifier failure. Soon as the battery dies the bike dies time to check the charging system. Get the volt meter out.
I would also check the battery connections they have a habit of undoing themselves.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
153 Posts
Sounds like the previous owner has been having issues, and sold his problems to you.
Like Maccecht said probably the charging system which is why it ran ok for a couple of days.
Should not be too difficult to sort out. Plenty of good support on here.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
14,251 Posts
My guess would also be a charging system problem. Although it could just be a bad battery.
Start by charging the battery fully then have it tested. If it test good then move on to testing the charging system.

The first test would be to hook a volt meter to the battery. Make sure you are starting with a good fully charged battery installed in the bike. Start the bike then see what the voltage reads with the engine running at idle. It should be somewhere around 13 volts. Bring the engine up to 5,000 rpm. Then you should be reading around 15 volts on the volt meter. If you fail those two test then it is likely you have either a bad stator or a bad regulator/rectifier or both. Let us know and we can advise you on how to test those.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
My guess would also be a charging system problem. Although it could just be a bad battery.
Start by charging the battery fully then have it tested. If it test good then move on to testing the charging system.

The first test would be to hook a volt meter to the battery. Make sure you are starting with a good fully charged battery installed in the bike. Start the bike then see what the voltage reads with the engine running at idle. It should be somewhere around 13 volts. Bring the engine up to 5,000 rpm. Then you should be reading around 15 volts on the volt meter. If you fail those two test then it is likely you have either a bad stator or a bad regulator/rectifier or both. Let us know and we can advise you on how to test those.
So I ended up testing the battery and it had a bad cell. Bought a new one and it fired right up. Let it idle for a bit, turned it off, and then back on for a 20ish min ride. Got to a red light and it died again. Temperature gauge was reading at 4/5 when it cut off.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,443 Posts
Have you heard the cooing fan run yet ? Check to see if fan blade spins freely ?

Charge the battery and then follow Buffalo’s instructions .
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
18,687 Posts
So I ended up testing the battery and it had a bad cell. Bought a new one and it fired right up. Let it idle for a bit, turned it off, and then back on for a 20ish min ride. Got to a red light and it died again. Temperature gauge was reading at 4/5 when it cut off.
Follow the link in the quote below.
Too many members have had charging system issues. This is always hitting you at the worst time and can kill a whole riding season.
Years ago I found this posting that may help. It also recommends a newer style regulator/rectifier if yours is bad.

There are a few suppliers of better than a STOCK Suzuki regulator/rectifier. I will post a couple later.

Here is a good outline on how to test before throwing parts at the bike.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Rusty J

·
Administrator
Joined
·
18,687 Posts
You can read the whole testing ideas here:
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
14,251 Posts
So I ended up testing the battery and it had a bad cell. Bought a new one and it fired right up. Let it idle for a bit, turned it off, and then back on for a 20ish min ride. Got to a red light and it died again. Temperature gauge was reading at 4/5 when it cut off.
I would still hook a volt meter up to it and check to see that the charging system is functioning correctly. A faulty charging system can kill a battery and vise versa. A cheap $12 multimeter from HarborFreight will do the job.

The temp gauge running high would probably be a separate issue from the electrical one. That could be a number of things. Might be a fan not coming on. Might be low on coolant. Might be a sticking thermostat. Might be something as simple as dirt clogging the fins on the radiator.

Mine got hot on me a while sitting at a railroad crossing a couple of weeks ago. Turned out to be mud that had been thrown up on the front of the radiator. Brushed it off and used compressed air to blow out the fins on the radiator and all was OK on my 300 mile junket last weekend.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
884 Posts
As already noted a battery will last about 20 minutes if it's not being charged. Be prepared to buy a new regulator rectifier. Check the coolant levels even better check it is 50/50 as water is a poorer coolant than anti freeze. I would personally change it out as it's due anyway.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
So I can't even get it to start again so my next question would be best place to purchase regulator/rectifier/stator?

I failed both tests Buffalo.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
14,251 Posts
Before you start buying you need to determine which one you need. The test is not hard and you can use the same multimeter used to test charging at the battery. However you will need to pull the left side body panel off to get to the plugs. Unless you are very lucky you will not be able to get to them otherwise. You will need to charge the battery again so that you can start the bike.

Once you gain access to the plugs the easiest thing to test is the stator output. There is a large white plug with three wires coming from the stator on one side and 3 wires going to the regulator/rectifier on the other side. Unplug it and start the bike. Put the multimeter on the AC setting,. Test voltage between the two outside prongs on the side coming from the stator. with the engine turning 5,000 rpm. It should read 50+ Volts. If it does then check voltage between one of the outside prongs and the center prog. Again it should read 50+ volts. If it does then check between the other outside prong and the center prong. Again you should get 50+ volts. If you fail to get 50+ volts on any of the three combinations then the stator is bad.

If the stator test good then you likely need a rectifier/regulator. That test procedure is also not hard to do but a little difficult to explain here. Difficult to explain because it has more steps and combinations of wires to test. There are a total of 20 combinations. You would probably be safe to assume the rectifier/regulators is bad. For that matter if the stator test bad it's likely the rectifier/regulator is bad and caused the stator to go bad.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
14,251 Posts
1 - 16 of 16 Posts
Top